Java Lecture Notes

These are the lecture notes I'm using in my course, Introduction to Java Programming, currently (Summer semester, 1997) being taught at Polytechnic University in Brooklyn (formerly known as Brooklyn Poly). This class is being taught at the senior undergraduate and introductory graduate level for computer science majors, and is split into 13 two hour, fifteen minute classes plus a final exam:

The final is 2 hours, closed book, closed notes.

The actual classes I'm teaching are two hours and ten minutes long, with a short break. This is the first time I've taught this course so I wouldn't be surprised if many of the weeks here are overly full. It may even be the case that a few weeks are too short.

If you wish to use these notes for personal education, entertainment, and enlightenment, please do. However they are primarily intended to accompany a course and lectures. These notes draw heavily from my text, The Java Developer's Resource, Prentice Hall, 1997; and I suspect you might find the actual book more edifying. You can purchase it from cbooks, amazon.com, or any of the usual sources of computer books.

If you would like to use, modify, or adapt these notes for a course of your own, to be taught at a degree-granting school or university, or at any other non-profit institution, you may do that under the condition that you make The Java Developer's Resource a required or recommended text for the course, and that your bookstore order at least some copies of it. You can contact Prentice Hall's educational sales department at 1-800-526-0485.

If you would like to use, modify, or adapt these notes for a course taught by a for-profit training company, you may do so if you purchase and give to each student in your class a copy of The Java Developer's Resource. The corporate sales department at Prentice Hall can assist you with bulk sales and quantity discounts.

A tar file of these notes is available only to teachers who adopt the The Java Developer's Resource as a required or recommended text. Once your bookstore or company has ordered the book, let me know and I'll send you a tar file of the entire current collection so you can more easily modify or rearrange them to meet your needs and print transparencies or handouts for use in class.

If you are teaching a course based on this material or on The Java Developer's Resource, please let me know by sending email to elharo@sunsite.unc.edu. If there's interest I may even see if I can set up a mailing list so teachers teaching this course can swap comments, exercises, test questions, and war stories.

Under no circumstances should you post these notes on any Internet servers visible to search engines or the public at large. You may modify and post them to internal servers visible only within your organization, if you wish. However, as I'm going to be heavily revising and adding to these notes throughout the next few months based on my experience teaching this course, this almost guarantees that your copy will be out of date. I strongly recommend you link to the official site at http://sunsite.unc.edu/javafaq/course/ instead.


Last Modified July 14, 1997
Copyright 1997 Elliotte Rusty Harold
elharo@sunsite.unc.edu